Death Penalty - States

Today, Terence Lenamon argued his motion that  Florida State Attorney Aramis Ayala be allowed to testify as part of the defense for Markeith Loyd.  Back in 2017, Ms. Ayala declined to seek the death penalty as prosecutor in the Loyd case; as a result, Governor Rick Scott replaced her at the state’s trial table.  (

As reported in the Tallahassee Democrat in its article “Funding for court-appointed counsel dries up; JAC can’t pay bills,” written by Jeffrey Schweers and published on April 11, 2019, Florida’s Justice Administrative Commission has run out of money.

Accordingly, Terence Lenamon has filed a motion to continue the current death penalty trial of

Terence Lenamon’s upcoming capital case docket involves the death penalty defense of Michael James Jackson.   Jackson is currently a resident of Florida’s Death Row.

Continuing Impact of Hurst on Florida Death Penalty

This case is one of the many Florida death penalty cases that have gone under review in the aftermath of Hurst v. Florida.  

California Governor Gavin Newsom Blocks Capital Punishment Throughout the State, Ending Death Penalty in a Single Order

In Florida, Texas, and most other states where prosecutors are given the option of seeking the death penalty (as are federal prosecutors under federal law), the focus is upon the individual case.  Will the state ask for death? 

What is a Petition for Writ of Prohibition? Death Penalty Defense and Petitions for Writs

In Florida, several requests can be filed with the appellate court while a death penalty trial is ongoing.  Parties can seek appellate review and issuance of appellate exercises of power that include writs of mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto, certiorari,

The Washington Supreme Court has found the death penalty to be unconstitutional because it violates the state constitution, specifically Article 1, Section 14, which states, “[e]xcessive bail shall not be required, excessive fines imposed, nor cruel punishment inflicted.”

State v. Gregory

From the opinion in State v. Gregory, No. 88086-7 (Wash. Oct. 11,